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Vocabulary related to computer/internet

edited November 2012 in French
Bonjour!

I'm curious to know if the French language employs many English words related to computer and internet. In Japanese, I'd say we use English for most computer/internet words. For instance, we use the words "computer", "mouse", "browser", "programming", "online", and many many more. We even use English verbs in the form of "English verb + suru". ("Suru" means "do" in Japanese.) For example, we say, "install-suru" (to install), "click-suru" (to click), "drag-and-drop-suru" (to drag and drop), etc. 

French may not be as extreme as Japanese when it comes to loaning foreign words, but I'm interested to see how prevalent (or not) English is when it comes to the topic of computer and internet. 

Merci beaucoup!

Comments

  • Bonjour, Sugita Sensee! Je pense que je peux répondre a ton question! ( I think that I can answer your question!) Often, in French, there is some correlation with English; e.g. the word pizza - en français une pizza. This somewhat applies in the case of programming and computer. The French word for computer is l'ordinateur (masculine), but the word for internet, I think, is the l'internet. Sometimes, the word is mostly the same with few changes. Programming, for example, is programmer (to program). As you can see, French does have some differences in computer and programming, but at the same time many similarities. J'espere c'est un bon reponse. 
  • Bonjour Sakura & Harsimran,

    Very good topic, and a little thorny so to speak. The Commission générale de terminologie et de néologie is a French assembly placed under the first minister whose mission is to make sure French language can keep up with such issues as the new computer terminology, especially coming from English.

    You will find several websites that present a french-english glossaries. While these terms are used, there is a tendency among computer programmers in France to borrow freely from the original terms, so sometimes it gets blurry.
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